Events

Full details of the seminar schedule Date Time Room Speaker Title Affiliation 7th October 14:00-15:00   online   Jafar Rezaei   Foundations of Best-Worst Method (an MCDM method)  Delft University of Technology 21st October 14:00-15:00   online click here to book Georgios Panos Financial literacy and Attitudes to Cryptocurrencies University of Glasgow 28th October (jointly…
CLICK HERE TO BOOK Abstract We examine the relationship between financial literacy and attitudes to cryptocurrencies, using microdata from 15 countries. Our financial-literacy proxy exerts a large negative effect on the probability of currently owning cryptocurrencies. The financially literate are also more likely to be aware, but not to intend to own cryptocurrencies. We show…
CLICK HERE TO BOOK Abstract: We run a laboratory experiment testing the correlation between time preferences and cheating at the individual level. In our experiment cheating increases the earnings of those who commit it and it only entails a moral cost for the cheater. Our hypothesis is that cheating is higher among individuals who attribute…
Numerous laboratory studies reveal that incidental emotions produce distinct effects on risky decision-making: e.g. while fear induces risk-averse choices, anger promotes risk-seeking choices. Accordingly, if risky driving decisions cause car accidents, emotionally arousing events might influence accident rates. Noting studies showing effects on voters’ happiness for both the 2016 UK Brexit referendum and 2016 US…

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Full details of the semester one CDR seminar series: Date (note) Time Room Speaker Title Affiliation 16 Oct 2019 (co-hosted with Economics Division) 14:00-15:00 Charles Thackrah 1.05 Neel Ocean Do people implicitly adjust for extreme online review score bias when evaluating quality? Economics, Leeds University Business School 30 Oct 2019 (co-hosted with Management Division) 14:00-15:00…
Dr. Romain Crastes Dit Sourd new to the Centre of Decision Research presents at this event.
Abstract It is fifty years since Amos Tversky presented evidence of intransitive preferences in his seminal 1969 article. Early replications of his main study, which involved choices between simple monetary lotteries, replicated his findings. However, later research has cast doubt on the strength of evidence of intransitive choices in this task. For example, Regenwetter et…
Abstract How much money do you need for your retirement? The implications of current balance information for retirement provision are considerably difficult for many of us to grasp or anticipate. A long tradition of using psychological insights to improve savers’ engagement with their pensions has led to major improvements in savings rates and participation. In this work we…
Dr. Adam Harris of UCL is presenting at this seminar.
Dr. Julia Bennell Deputy Dean of Leeds University Business School is presenting at this seminar.
Dr. Gianni Nicolini Ass. Prof. of Finance at the Department of Management and Law of the University of Rome is presenting at this seminar
Dr. Xingjie Wei a Lecturer in Business Analytics/Machine Learning with CDR is presenting at this seminar.
Samuel Domingos a PhD candidate in the Social Psychology program (LiSP) at ISPA is presenting at this seminar.
Natalie van der Wal a Marie Sklodowska-Curie Research Fellow at CDR is presenting at this seminar.