Events

Full details of the seminar schedule Date Time Room Speaker Title Affiliation 7th October 14:00-15:00   online   Jafar Rezaei   Foundations of Best-Worst Method (an MCDM method)  Delft University of Technology 21st October 14:00-15:00   online click here to book Georgios Panos Financial literacy and Attitudes to Cryptocurrencies University of Glasgow 28th October (jointly…
CLICK HERE TO BOOK Abstract We examine the relationship between financial literacy and attitudes to cryptocurrencies, using microdata from 15 countries. Our financial-literacy proxy exerts a large negative effect on the probability of currently owning cryptocurrencies. The financially literate are also more likely to be aware, but not to intend to own cryptocurrencies. We show…
CLICK HERE TO BOOK Abstract: We run a laboratory experiment testing the correlation between time preferences and cheating at the individual level. In our experiment cheating increases the earnings of those who commit it and it only entails a moral cost for the cheater. Our hypothesis is that cheating is higher among individuals who attribute…
Numerous laboratory studies reveal that incidental emotions produce distinct effects on risky decision-making: e.g. while fear induces risk-averse choices, anger promotes risk-seeking choices. Accordingly, if risky driving decisions cause car accidents, emotionally arousing events might influence accident rates. Noting studies showing effects on voters’ happiness for both the 2016 UK Brexit referendum and 2016 US…

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Abstract We present some ongoing research which attempts to connect more decision-making areas (e.g. individual differences in judgment and decision-making – JDM, behavioural decision-making – BDM, decision-making competence – DMC, debiasing) to I/O psychology domain. During the seminar we try will to answer questions such as: Can organizational assessment benefit from studying individual differences in…
Abstract: We report results from an eye-tracking experiment designed to study a violation of revealed preference predicted by salience theory: Individuals choose a low quality good with a low price level and a high quality good with a high price level, despite the price of the quality premium being held constant. Subjects exhibited a significant number of such preference…
The effects of time pressure on cognitive strategy, affect and hindrance/challenge appraisals underpinning managerial decision making